Beech Fir forest in Romania

Supporting Ranger Patrols

Beech Fir forest in Romania

Supporting Ranger Patrols

“Rewilding is a forward-thinking approach to conservation. It’s about giving nature a helping hand and allowing it to take care of itself, enabling natural processes to shape land and sea, repair damaged ecosystems and restore degraded landscapes. Through rewilding, wildlife’s natural rhythms create wilder, more biodiverse habitats.”

– Rewilding Europe

1. What is a Rewilding Impact Project Vote?

2. Support Ranger Patrols

3. Set Up Camera Traps

4. We have a Winner

5. The Intervention in Action

“Rewilding is a forward-thinking approach to conservation. It’s about giving nature a helping hand and allowing it to take care of itself, enabling natural processes to shape land and sea, repair damaged ecosystems and restore degraded landscapes. Through rewilding, wildlife’s natural rhythms create wilder, more biodiverse habitats.”

– Rewilding Europe

 

1. What is a Rewilding Vote?

2. Support Ranger Patrols

3. Set Up Camera Traps

4. We have a Winner

5. The Intervention in Action

What is a Rewilding Impact Project Vote?

Each three months we propose 2 or 3 much needed rewilding interventions at one of our projects, and have our members vote on what they would like to see done. The interventions focus on smaller scale conservation projects that are harder to fund but very worthy to tackle.

For the first rewilding impact project vote, our focus turned to the ancient forests of the Southern Carpathians, where we work with Fundatia Conservation Carpathia (FCC), a local organisation working on the protection of the wild ecosystems. Here, our members were given the choice between installing a pair of camera traps or supporting ranger patrols in the existing old growth forests of Romania.

A beech fir forest in Southern Carpathians

What is a Rewilding Impact Project Vote?

Each three months we propose 2 or 3 much needed rewilding interventions at one of our projects, and have our members vote on what they would like to see done. The interventions focus on smaller scale conservation projects that are harder to fund but very worthy to tackle.

For the first rewilding impact project vote, our focus turned to the ancient forests of the Southern Carpathians, where we work with Fundatia Conservation Carpathia (FCC), a local organisation working on the protection of the wild ecosystems. Here, our members were given the choice between installing a pair of camera traps or supporting ranger patrols in the existing old growth forests of Romania.

A beech fir forest in Southern Carpathians

Support Ranger Patrols

Regular patrols and having a presence in the mountains really help protect the existing old growth forests from illegal logging and poaching, as well as building a bridge between the conservation world and local communities. The intervention would help support a variety of expenses that includes salaries, fuel for the vehicles, vehicle repairs and GPS equipment.

A forest ranger stands next to his car in nature
A forest ranger stands next to his car in nature

Support Ranger Patrols

Regular patrols and having a presence in the mountains really help protect the existing old growth forests from illegal logging and poaching, as well as building a bridge between the conservation world and local communities. The intervention would help support a variety of expenses that includes salaries, fuel for the vehicles, vehicle repairs and GPS equipment.

Set Up Camera Traps

Camera traps not only showcase incredible imagery of wild animals in their natural habitats unperturbed by humans, but these cameras play a pivotal role in helping ecologists research animal behavioural patterns and track specie numbers. For example, no two lynxes have the same markings and so after various visits to a camera trap area, ecologists can ascertain local numbers of lynx. What’s more, the cameras are also very useful in helping the rangers protect the forests from poaching and illegal logging.

A wolf in Romania's Southern Carpathians
Rewilding vote results displayed in a pie chart

It was a close call, but it was the additional patrolling to prevent illegal activities that took the vote.

The Intervention in Action

We returned to the Southern Carpathians the following spring on a tree planting intervention, where we had the chance to spend four days being guided by several of the FCC rangers. They are as passionate as they are knowledgeable about the mountains, and have seen a significant decline in illegal clear cutting and poaching since they have had a regular presence in the area. The rangers believe that once local communities truly understand the value of preserving nature, which is happening slowly, such regular patrols will not be required.

Our rewilding impact project has helped fund the ongoing expenses for vehicle maintenance and fuel for 2 rangers for 6 months.

We have collected a 360 degree photo for every member that contributed to this project and you can see the full database below.

A forest ranger on location in the Southern Carpathians

Daniel, on location at an illegal clear cut site in the Southern Carpathians

Set Up Camera Traps

Camera traps not only showcase incredible imagery of wild animals in their natural habitats unperturbed by humans, but these cameras play a pivotal role in helping ecologists research animal behavioural patterns and track specie numbers. For example, no two lynxes have the same markings and so after various visits to a camera trap area, ecologists can ascertain local numbers of lynx. What’s more, the cameras are also very useful in helping the rangers protect the forests from poaching and illegal logging.

A wolf in Romania's Southern Carpathians
Rewilding vote results displayed in a pie chart

It was a close call, but it was the additional patrolling to prevent illegal activities that took the vote.

The Intervention in Action

We returned to the Southern Carpathians the following spring on a tree planting intervention, where we had the chance to spend four days being guided by several of the FCC rangers. They are as passionate as they are knowledgeable about the mountains, and have seen a significant decline in illegal clear cutting and poaching since they have had a regular presence in the area. The rangers believe that once local communities truly understand the value of preserving nature, which is happening slowly, such regular patrols will not be required.

Our rewilding impact project has helped fund the ongoing expenses for vehicle maintenance and fuel for 2 rangers for 6 months.

We have collected a 360 degree photo for every member that contributed to this project and you can see the full database below.

A forest ranger on location in the Southern Carpathians

Daniel, on location at an illegal clear cut site in the Southern Carpathians

Sources & further reading

✅ for peer reviewed research

  1. 1.“A Manifesto for Rewilding the World” – George Monbiot – monbiot.com
  2. 2. “Rewilding Success Stories” – The Guardian – theguardian.com
  3. 3. “Rewilding abandoned landscapes in Europe”LM Navarro, HM Pereira 2015, Ecosystems, September 2012, Volume 15, Issue 6, pp 900–912, Springer Link Publishing 
  4. 4. "Restoration, Reintroduction, and Rewilding in a Changing World” – Richard T.Corlett 2016 – Trends In Ecology & Evolution Volume 31, Issue 6, June 2016, Pages 453-462 – sciencedirect.com  ✅
  5. 5. “The change of European landscapes: human-nature relationships, public attitudes towards rewilding, and the implications for landscape management in Switzerland” – N Bauer, A Wallner, M Hunziker 2009  – Journal of Environmental Management Volume 90, Issue 9, July 2009, Pages 2910-2920 – sciencedirect.com 

Sources & further reading

✅ for peer reviewed research

  1. 1.“A Manifesto for Rewilding the World” – George Monbiot – monbiot.com
  2. 2. “Rewilding Success Stories” – The Guardian – theguardian.com
  3. 3. “Rewilding abandoned landscapes in Europe”LM Navarro, HM Pereira 2015, Ecosystems, September 2012, Volume 15, Issue 6, pp 900–912, Springer Link Publishing 
  4. 4. "Restoration, Reintroduction, and Rewilding in a Changing World” – Richard T.Corlett 2016 – Trends In Ecology & Evolution Volume 31, Issue 6, June 2016, Pages 453-462 – sciencedirect.com  ✅
  5. 5. “The change of European landscapes: human-nature relationships, public attitudes towards rewilding, and the implications for landscape management in Switzerland” – N Bauer, A Wallner, M Hunziker 2009  – Journal of Environmental Management Volume 90, Issue 9, July 2009, Pages 2910-2920 – sciencedirect.com